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July 28, 2014, 11:19 AM

One concept that is missing from the book of Esther... Big Time.


We're wrapping up a series on Esther here at Red Bridge this coming Sunday.  It is curious the varied responses I've gotten throughout the series and the rather blunt and negative paintings I've displayed on the characters of Esther's story.  Through it all the general anxiety I've created is that we want to cheer for the characters in this book, placing them on the pedestal of hero while ignoring some of the harsher bits of apathy or lapses in character.  But when it comes right down to it, when the rubber meets the road, the characters leave little to cheer for without some digging and generous applications of grace.  

Allow me one more sweeping critique of this story and it's characters before we wrap things up Sunday (8/3/14) with what I believe is the pivotal lesson to be learned from Esther.  Here we go... buckle up one more time:  There is zero presence of forgiveness in the story of Esther.

Instead of forgiveness and grace we see bitter rivalry and prejudice.  These characteristics show themselves in Mordecai and Haman, leading to the near destruction of the Jewish nation.  We cannot expect Haman to exhibit any godly characteristics, as his story and history is devoid of grace.  Mordecai, however, should know better.  He is familiar enough with the story of the original captivity, the wanderings in the desert, the attempts to claim the Promised Land and ALL of the failings of Israel to understand that there are bigger things to worry about than a grudge.  

If I were given the liberty to retool the story of Esther, the one thing I would incorporate into the characters would be the addition of giant robots that wipe out Persia and return it to the peaceful nations that existed prior to the conquest and captivity.  I guess that's why they didn't let me write anything.  In reality, the last thing I need is another reminder of how much I lack in the grace-giving department.  Instead of giant robots, the one piece that I would really add is that of forgiveness.  More than God's hand showing up and saving the day ala Daniel.  More than a mighty miracle that reshapes everyone's belief system in one fell swoop.  I want to see how forgiveness and grace can reshape the story of Esther. 

The story of Esther, far removed from my own existence and experiences, is a pleasant place to start with wishing for more of God's grace to be shown.  It is far more unpleasant to want to see more of God's grace expressed in my own life circumstances.  When grace rules the day, anger is pushed out.  Impatience is not allowed to rule our attitudes.  Prejudices and grudges disappear, fading away in the shadows of peacemaking and forgiveness.  I really wonder how the story would have reshaped itself if Mordecai treated Haman with the respect and impartial care he chose to offer Xerxes (remember Mordecai saved Xerxes' life despite the captivity and enslavement of his people at the hand of Xerxes).  

What I really wonder, far more than with the story of Esther, is how the Church's story would look if we infused our lives with forgiveness and grace.  In a global scale, would we see an end to prejudice, or would we even care anymore?  If we echoed God's grace in every action, word, and breath we wouldn't worry about the angst of others, we would've already forgiven them!  Focusing in closer, what would our neighborhoods look like if we were the people known to forgive and accept?  Red Bridge would become known for its people and their acts of grace that glorify God, rather than being known as the "one across from the big Baptist Church" (with the typical response being: "Oh, I didnt know that was a church building.")  

To end this thought with how we began: How would the story of Esther change? Esther's story would look a lot more like Daniel's story if we infused it with grace and forgiveness.  So would mine.  So would yours.  And so would Haman's.  


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