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August 25, 2014, 11:47 AM

Holy, Holy, Holy. And how that might not be enough for us...


There are moments in worship services that just blow me away and send the good kind of chills up my spine.  I'm reluctant to say it, but these moments are rare for me.  I'm often in planning mode, or checking the order/slides/notes to make sure its running as well as I can control (which is limited) and getting my head ready to preach.  This week though, I had a moment that didn't just blow me away, it left a mark on my soul.  We sang On Zion's Glorious Summit early in the service, and if I could have, I would have gotten up and laid down a sermon right then and there.  What hit me is the final portion of the song, in which we slowly recount the song of the angels: "Holy, Holy, Holy."  

The voices around me were beautiful, and the parts rang true, making a sound as close to heaven as I can imagine.  There was no rush to get through, and the final notes echoed for a breath.  Those words rested on my heart, and it was about 1:30 in the morning that the thoughts finally registered as to why.  The question I woke to was this:  Would I really be content to sing that for eternity?  

If you're like me, the question can be easily dismissed with a "sure."  After all, when we're in Heaven, we wont have to worry about anything much, right?  I mean, GOD is right THERE!!!  But I moved deeper into the question and thought of a few other songs we're familiar with, and I began to be haunted by my own understandings of what being contented in eternity means.  Remember these choruses:  "I've got a mansion just over the hilltop."  "Till my trophies at last I'll lay down."   And what about the images we hold closely of gold-paved driveways, and crystal seas?  

What if?  What if there wasn't a single mansion, crown, trophy case, gold brick, or crystal body of water to be seen anywhere?  Would we start looking for the suggestion box and a golf pencil to throw out some renovation suggestions?  We would start the suggestion kindly, probably with a "To start, I'm REALLY glad I'm here and not.......you know <points down>..."  After we get the gratitude out of the way, the real issue would present itself:   "BUT, I'm looking around and maybe I missed my turn.  Where's MY mansion? I didn't put up with Sister So-and-So for three decades to be shuffled along into just another apartment complex or homeless all together."  

Examining this idea leads us to the Lord's Prayer.  As the model for prayer and communication with God, we find this very issue being addressed.  If we are willing to pray for God's will "to be on earth as it is in heaven..." we must be willing to find ourselves content on earth with what we will find ourselves content with in heaven.  Finally able to abide in the presence of God, completely joined with our creator is THE completion of all eternity.  We will find ourselves content for eternity without the gold, mansions, trophies, and crowns because God Is, and we will be with the I Am.  If we want on earth as in heaven, then we must find ourselves content with singing "Holy, Holy, Holy" to honor the magnificence of God as we stare into the face of a world being torn down around us.  We must find ourselves able to find contentment with God no matter what this world holds.  

One of my favorite authors for challenging me and getting me to think outside the box is Peter Rollins.  I've read a few of his parables during some sermons, and one that is coming to mind resides in The Orthodox Heretic with the title of the parable being Mansions.  It imagines a time with Jesus describing Heaven to some of his disciples around a fire.  He uses magnificent words to describe just how wonderful it will be, playing on the grandiose ideas present in the poor and working class folks who follow him.  They all drift into sleep thinking of all the glittering gold and towering mansions that await them as their reward.  It isn't until everyone is asleep that one disciple decides to brave out loud the thoughts rolling silently in his head.  He declares to Jesus that he isn't really drawn to the glamorous things like gold and mansions, and he wonders if there will be a place in heaven for one like him; one content with simpler rewards.  Jesus looks at him with a twinkle in his eye and tells him that indeed there is a place.  He speaks of a small, one-room shack on the outskirts that has holes in the roof that allow one to see the magnificence of the stars and glory of heaven.  In a whisper Jesus tells the man:  "that's where you'll find me, and you're welcome anytime."  

Can I be content with singing praise to the I Am knowing there isn't a mansion, trophy, or crown in it for me?  Can we find joy in worship even if we're broke?  


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