Blog
Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9   
January 23, 2017, 8:33 AM

So What?



The book of James was very present in the sermon yesterday, we just didn't talk about it!  So lets do that here.  

Our big question was "So What?"  Since we've established our belief in God, what are we going to do about it?  Orderly attendance and a routine Sunday schedule is not enough evidence in our lives to prove our lives are really, really changed by our belief system.  If we follow the formula that James presents to us in the New Testament, then we are either convinced we're doing enough to exhibit our level of belief or we choose to ignore both sides of James' good works/faith equation.  

Over and over again James presents his equation, 'If you claim to be religious, have faith THEN you will display it OUT LOUD."  

God's presence in our lives is a game changer.  (Understatement of the Day).  We are changed by the Creator of the Universe in us.  He is our God, our Father, our Personal God.   So what? 

Does it change anything other than Sunday morning?  That is not sufficient enough of faith expression to prove anything other than a slightly guilty conscious or the need for routine/habitual Church attendance based on a flawed belief system that has been beaten into us that attendance is enough.  

Is attendance and participation important?  YES, ABSOLUTELY!  You cant have the Head (Jesus) without the Body (the Church).  But living your faith for one or two hours a week only leaves another 166 hours devoted to __________.  

James 2: 14 - 17  14What good is it, dear brothers and sisters, if you say you have cfaith but don’t show it by your actions? Can that kind of cfaith save anyone?15Suppose you see a brother or sister who has no food or clothing,16and you say, “Good-bye and have a good day; stay warm and eat well”—but then you don’t give that person any food or clothing. What good does that do?

17So you see, faith by itself isn’t enough. Unless it produces good deeds, it is dead and useless.




January 16, 2017, 11:51 AM

Ask a Better Question



Should you really be asking "Is there a God?"   If you know NOTHING about God and faith and belief, then yes that is a good place to begin.  However, if you are a regular member, attending weekly and understanding the basic tenants of belief then it is not a good place to start.  You should already be past that.  

When we read Scripture, that question's answer is implied...  Scripture assumes Yes, and moves on.  Scripture doesn't answer "Is there a God?" it paints a picture of his character.  

The better question you need answer is this:  "Who is God?"  To answer that you need to dive into the Bible and discover how his character is drawn up by his interaction with this world, starting with Adam and Eve all the way through to John's Revelation.  He shows us who he is, what he loves, what he doesn't like, and what promises he is waiting to fulfill.  All you need to do is read and discover it.  

That sounds simple, doesn't it?  If it were so, I believe there wouldn't be nearly as many denominations and varying sects of faith.  We carry with us our own answer the the question (Who is God?) with us every time we open the Bible.  Too often that allows us to pigeonhole what we read and what we learn about God.  If God is angry, or better yet if you're angry, finding those stories where is wrath is evident is easy.  If you're hoping for a Teddy-Bear God, finding his moments of compassion and mercy are easy.  

The problem is we cant pick and choose which characteristics we like most and define God, the Creator of the Universe by them.  We must see his entire picture and be shaped by that.  Does his justice AND compassion shape your understanding of his character?  I hope so, because we are called to treat this world the same way we are taught by God in the text.  All of the text, not just our favorite verses.  

My challenge for kicking off the Believe series this week is to Think about God every day.  Make sure your heart is tuned into his character intentionally in the routine of life.  See where God works and plays, and where his compassion shines through (I'm betting we'll be surprised).  See where his justice reigns.  See everything God created for you and be in wonder.  

Think about God...  because I know he's thinking about you.  

1 Chronicles 16:9a   9 The eyes of the LORD search the whole earth in order to strengthen those whose hearts are fully committed to him.




January 9, 2017, 8:58 AM

What I know vs. What I love



I know lots of things.  Most of them useless.  

I love a few things.  All of them vital to my existence.  

Which do I pursue with vigor?  What I know.  

These past two weeks our sermons have been shaped by the thoughts presented in James Smith's book You Are What You Love.  And we will wrap that up right here by summarizing both weeks.   If life were really about just what we KNOW, then imagine all the troubles and issues that would disappear!  Obesity would be put on notice practically overnight.  Because we KNOW we need to eat our veggies, exercise, and avoid junk food.  So many issues and risks we take would vanish.  

And yet we continue to sin,  Even when we KNOW better.  We know the consequences of sin (death).  We know that sin separates us from God.  We know the guilt we feel when we give in to temptation.  And yet......... we sin.  We KNOW better.  

If we are what we know, then why aren't we better people?  Why aren't we better Christians?  Why does forgiveness come so difficult to us?  Why does giving feel like pulling teeth sometimes?  Why do we keep ourselves formed into little cliques and safely within our constructed buildings instead of evangelizing the world so desperate for the Good News?  We KNOW better! 

Because we are not what we know.  We are what we love.  And we love comfort, convenience, and ourselves.   And what we love shapes us, forms us, and determines our identity.  We sing loudly the songs we love.  We grumble when the songs aren't the ones we like.  We love our routines, but get frustrated when someone sits in our seat.  During the week we passionately pursue what we've chosen to love.  

When we follow Jesus we inevitably get pulled into situations in which our comfort is threatened.  Imagine if the disciples knew completely what they were getting into when they dropped their nets and followed Jesus!  What they knew was about to be in direct conflict with the one they chose to love.  Dont go sailing in storms is a solid nugget of knowledge.  Dont travel through Samaria was drilled into their brains by centuries of cultural prejudice.  Dont touch lepers, in fact stay away from them completely was just common sense at the time.  

And yet the heart of Jesus, and the love they had for the Rabbi put them into situations of direct conflict with they knew.  

What do you know that has kept you from pursuing the heart of Christ today?  What knowledge has been passed down through time to keep you from chasing the Cross in light of chasing comfort and convenience?  

Is it about what you KNOW or what you LOVE that is going to shape you today?  




January 2, 2017, 8:55 AM

A Distracted Heart



My phone has been really buggy recently, and its got me more distracted than usual. 

I am also having trouble getting decent reception on my television since I mounted it on the wall, away from the windows.  

Within two weeks I had to replace the batteries in both vehicles.  

On top of ALL that, something I ordered online arrived at my house (after two-day shipping, of course) broken, so I had to wait another week or so until I could sort it all out. 

You could say my life is pretty difficult right now.  Or you could say I'm being silly and getting distracted by stupid, meaningless stuff.  No matter which path you choose, there is a stark reality we need to address: We've all gotten pretty distracted. 

There are things in this world that need our attention.  And there are things in this world that GET our attention.  Unfortunately, those don't match up very well. 

Our current sermon series (part 1 found here) is looking at the desires of our heart... because the desires of our hearts is what defines us.  Too often we think, therefore we are...  Not so true.  Just because we "know" something, doesn't mean anything changes.  What changes us is what we "want" and therefore go and get.   I know I should eat more vegetables and less pizza.  But I want to eat pizza, therefore I eat too much pizza and not enough vegetables.  

If our lives were determined by what we "know" then I would be a world class athlete (in all sports), a high profile movie critic, and a successful business man.  But what I am is determined not by what I know, but by what I've shown myself to want.  (which is pizza).  

So what do you want?  

Because what we want defines us.  

John 1: 35 - 37   35The following day John was again standing with two of his disciples.36As Jesus walked by, John looked at him and declared, “Look! There is the iLamb of God!”37When John’s two disciples heard this, they followed Jesus.

38Jesus looked around and saw them following. “What do you want?” he asked them.




December 19, 2016, 9:09 AM

What makes us different?



Big question:  Are we any different?

Sure we have a routine that makes our weekends look different.  Sure we have a category in our closets with the title of "Church Clothes." But it it enough? 

The same question can be asked about the Christmas holiday:  Is it any different?  According to culture, Christmas is a time to SPEND, SPEND, SPEND!!!  Which doesnt sound any different than any other holiday in which we need to decorate, get season-appropriate cards, etc...  

Big answer:  Yes, we're different because of Love.  Christmas is different because of Love. 

God showed us our value in Christmas.  God became vulnerable on Christmas.  God paid a cost far above the return value for Christmas.  

Because he loves us.  That makes this holiday different than any other, except maybe Easter Sunday which celebrates the same valuation of sinners worldwide with the sacrifice of the Cross being front and center. 

While we may disagree on Christmas trees, whether or not we should celebrate on the 25th... we have to acknowledge the reason behind this holiday and what makes it different.  Jesus.  Its not about questions or the details... its about the Messiah.  

And that makes all the difference in the world.  

At least for a few weeks of the year.  What we do with the rest is up to us. 




December 12, 2016, 8:45 AM

The Best Kind of Present...



Is the one you didn't know you needed, but shows itself so useful later on that you never knew how you lived without it.  

I have opened my share of dud-gifts in my life.  I'm sure you have too... We've made a niche of ugly Christmas sweaters, so much that they are now popular and hard to find at thrift stores.  Fruitcake.  I don't need to explain that one further.  

They're almost a stereotype, the gift that is just poorly thought out...  But lets not dwell on the disappointing gifts... what about those that are so useful that they make up for all the sweaters and socks.  Sometimes its a gadget you didn't know what as useful as you thought.  Maybe it was something for the kitchen that makes preparing your favorite dish more efficient.  Whatever it is, I hope you've had the surprise of that kind of present.  

Not to be so simple and trite, but Jesus is that type of present for us.  Is he the gift expected?  No, we've been through this before.  He was not royalty, not born into a family that had political sway, nor was he adopted into such place (think: Moses and Egypt).  This was the gift we needed, but not the gift we wanted.  

This gift created the tension of sacrifice vs. self-preservation.  Because of the gift of Jesus brought about the conflict of dying to self as opposed to gaining reputation and fame in this world.  And as far as I can tell from human nature, no one asked for that!  "Dear Santa, please make me uncomfortable this year with what I believe and how I behave."  Nope.  

And yet there are centuries of believers who've put their trust in the gift of our Messiah.  Its time to unwrap that gift.  

Luke 1: 29 - 37    29Confused and disturbed, Mary tried to think what the angel could mean.30“Don’t be afraid, Mary,” the angel told her, “for you have found favor with God!31You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you will name him Jesus.32He will be very great and will be called the Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his ancestor David.33And he will reign over Israel forever; his Kingdom will never end!”

34Mary asked the angel, “But how can this happen? I am a virgin.”

35The angel replied, “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you. So the baby to be born will be holy, and he will be called the Son of God.36What’s more, your relative Elizabeth has become pregnant in her old age! People used to say she was barren, but she has conceived a son and is now in her sixth month.37For nothing is impossible with God.”




December 5, 2016, 8:43 AM

Counter-Culture



A quick hit blog for Christmas:  What would a commercial for the birth of Jesus would look like today?   

If it were left up to executives or travel agencies, Bethlehem would be absolutely void of stables or sparsely apportioned inns.  There would be comfortable beds (plenty of them), people on staff to take care of every need you could think of (even giving birth) at all hours of the night.  Not a food trough in sight. 

And yet the travel agency of Rome demanded attendance in Bethlehem.  Late arrival?  Tough.  Third trimester?  Tough.  Prophecies of a new-born king?  No big deal.  

The star that lead to our Savior then still leads us today.  Into a place of sacrifice that blesses.  To a place where discomfort produces faithfulness.  To a place that is a travel agent's worst nightmare.  

Will you make the trip?  

Luke 2: 1 - 7  1At that time the Roman emperor, Augustus, decreed that a census should be taken throughout the Roman Empire.2(This was the first census taken when Quirinius was governor of Syria.)3All returned to their own ancestral towns to register for this census.4And because Joseph was a descendant of King David, he had to go to Bethlehem in Judea, David’s ancient home. He traveled there from the village of Nazareth in Galilee.5He took with him Mary, his fiancée, who was now obviously pregnant.

6And while they were there, the time came for her baby to be born.7She gave birth to her efirst child, a son. She wrapped him snugly in strips of cloth and laid him in a manger, because there was no lodging available for them.

 




November 28, 2016, 9:00 AM

Balance.



There is a theme in my ministry (sermons) that I cant help but speak at almost every opportunity:  Live the Story.  

Here's the meat behind that concept:  we must act as though we are Christ-Followers at every moment, not just when in the presence of other Christians.  To give you (the reader) the context, I was a youth minister for the first 12 years of my career, and this theme was shaped out of that decade of experiences.  

Too many times I would experience the absolute best of a student, see changes and hear positive responses to the call of Jesus.  Commitments were made, and faith seemed to be the driving force of behavior.  And then I see social media comments, stories told from friends, and parents asking me why I haven't taught little Joe about the dangers of _______ or _______ (insert your favorite teenage rebellion or sin).   It became such a pattern that I could predict certain behavior trends in certain individuals (think: the last night of camp where the emotion of the week overwhelms tired minds).  

Yes, I became jaded.  Yes, I adjusted quickly how I taught and the expectations I had.  No longer was attendance the highest goal (Yay! You made it this week!).  No longer was mountain-top confession and repentance the goal of weekend trips (CIY does this to great effect). 

What became the focus of ministry and teaching was the valleys, those points when real life was happening.  In the classroom, when the parents aren't home, when they were alone with their boy/girl-friend, when depression and anxiety ruled the day.  That mentality has crept into my time as preaching minister... In the times when we're not dressed up and at church is where the heart of faith is grown. 

Because there is a truth that we need to face:  The behavior of children is taught and cultivated at home.  Behavior patterns need reinforced in order to "stick."   Yes, genetics and hereditary features can come in to play... but we cant use that as an excuse.  Racism is taught. 100%.  Prejudice is taught.  And weak faith practices are reinforced by practices and behavior outside the Church.  

Our time together in Christian activity (1 or 2 hours a week, tops) cannot be what balances, or even redeems us.   What proves a heart seeking to follow Christ is shown in actually following Christ.  We wrapped up a small group series recently entitled: Not a Fan.  The premise is this:  "Are you a fan of Jesus?  Or are you a Follower?"  Because following Christ happens in the valleys, in real life, when we're alone and the minister isn't around to keep his eyes on us.  

Lets change the world by teaching the world through consistent, Christ-like behavior where ever we are. Especially when we're not at Church. 

Colossians 3: 16 - 17  16Let the message about iChrist, in all its richness, fill your lives. Teach and counsel each other with all the wisdom he gives. Sing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs to God with thankful hearts.17And whatever you do or say, do it as a representative of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks through him to God the Father.




November 21, 2016, 9:08 AM

A Blessing for Thanksgiving



May our hearts be as full as our stomachs. 

May our family be as welcome as the dessert table. 

May our joy shine as clear as our passion for football on Thursday afternoon. 

As we gather, wherever we are, let the light of Christ shine through our gratitude and thankfulness for our salvation.  

1 Thessalonians 5: 18   18Be thankful in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you who belong to Christ Jesus.

 

Be blessed in this season of Thanksgiving.  




November 14, 2016, 9:07 AM

Bears, Endures, Believes, and Hopes



Those are the characteristics of what Love Does.  Love, one of the eternal elements of belief that will remain when all else fails (alongside faith and hope - 1 Cor. 13).  This all stems from a worship moment I had yesterday, when my brain decided to take a left turn during a song.  Instead of focusing on the heart of the song, I got bored with my prescribed 4 notes and spend time looking at the words...  What does Love do?  It Bears all things.  It Endures all things.  It Hopes all things.  It Believes all things.  (At least according to The Greatest Command).  

What can love bear?  It is not a muscle.  Yet Love bears the years we spend in grief, the hours of our heartbreak, the lifetime of our pursuit of the perfect relationship with Christ.  Love can carry the heaviest weight we have:  time.  

What does love endure?  It is not an object to punish.  Yet love endures our vain pursuits, our desires to be thought of well by the world, the days we spend seeking a better reputation.  Love endures our distracted hearts, drawing us closer and closer to Christ. 

What does love hope for?  Completeness.  Unity.  Love hopes for things far beyond our imagination... Love hopes for the very heart of God to be realized here on Earth. 

What does love believe?  The best of us.  Just like Jesus. 

The story that John tells in 1, 2, and 3 John is of the power Love has over this world.  It is the identifier of a follower of Christ.  It is what separates us from those without the Holy Spirit.  

What can we endure?  Not much...  but the love of God will endure eternally.  

1 Corinthians 13: 4 - 7  4Love is patient and kind. Love is not jealous or boastful or proud5or rude. It does not demand its own way. It is not irritable, and it keeps no record of being wronged.6It does not rejoice about injustice but rejoices whenever the truth wins out.7Love never gives up, never loses faith, is always hopeful, and endures through every circumstance. 




October 31, 2016, 9:02 AM

Reversing Worship



In my sermon yesterday (10/30) I mentioned a trend that worship has taken that needs to stop - Bottom Up worship.  Let me walk through the idea:  We show up on Sunday morning (or your appointed time) and tell God what we think.  The songs/sermon/scriptures are chosen to be uplifting to us, and if they aren't we walk away unsatisfied, or unfed.  Prayers are expressed for our problems, the sick, the needy, the Country.  Everything focuses on us, and if it doesn't we look for a place that will meet our needs (or our children's needs, etc...).  
Now, yes, this is a blanket statement about the state of worship, and the state of "church."  Yes, I am a part of the system that has both created and cultivated this mindset.  So Yes, the fingers are pointing in ALL directions as we dive into this thought and challenge!  

This form of worship expression (Bottom-Up) creates virtues out of things that were never really virtues to begin with:  attendance, authenticity, habit, and consumerism.  When worship is all about US, just showing up is a virtue, is a celebration, is reason to think we've got something right in the world. After all, how many people dont make an effort on Sunday morning to gather in fellowship and worship?  Just showing up is not a virtue.  Neither is authenticity.  Many, many, many worship leaders (and preachers too) seek authenticity in their services.  Here's what it means:  "God, I REALLY mean what I'm singing and saying and praying right now.  Really, really."   

Why seek authenticity?  Because we're not authentic, by nature.  And when it comes to worship, we feel the need to convince our neighbors in the pew, the preacher, the worship leader, and God that we really mean it this time when we sing I Surrender All.  

Authenticity is not a virtue.  Neither is consumerism, or your habits.  Those are traits of a soul wrapped in the comforts of culture.  

So what SHOULD worship look like?  To be simple, its a Top-Down experience.  Yes it is VERY appropriate to speak/sing our hearts to God and tell him exactly what we're feeling and dealing with.  But that is not the focus of the experience.  What God has to say is what is important.  NO, that does not mean the sermon is more important than anything else.  God's Word incarnate in communion, in the call to live sacrificially and generously, and the example already given by Jesus are what TOP-Down worship looks like.  We cant really be waiting around for a new, fabulous, get rich quick, grow your church with one easy step program message to arrive every week.  God has already spoken his heart for his people, and has set the table for our worship experiences.  

He uses his word to speak of the virtues he seeks:  patience, love, compassion, generosity, sacrifice...  none of which look anything like the virtues we've made of our expectations of worship today.  When David prayed and sang through the Psalms he cried his heart out for deliverance and peace... but was willing to wait for God's will and timing and work to be done WHEN GOD WAS READY.  He displayed a Top-Down worship: --  "Here's what I'm feeling, God...  You are God, I'm not...  I submit to your will."   That sounds a lot like Jesus' prayer in the Garden before the episode of the Cross.  

Habakkuk got the same message across to God in his written works late in the OT, and well into the captivity.  "God, look at the ruin and mess and loss that used to be your people, Israel.  Restore us!!  But not on my time....in Yours."  (Chris' Paraphrase).  God speaks to Habakkuk (and us) with comfort and the expectation of God's virtues: patience in affliction, compassion to those in charge, repentance to wickedness, and a love of God's laws.  Israel was reformed by reversing worship... We can do the same.  

Habakkuk 3: 16 b - 19   I will wait quietly for the coming day when disaster will strike the people who invade us. 17Even though the fig trees have no blossoms, and there are no grapes on the vines; even though the olive crop fails, and the fields lie empty and barren; even though the flocks die in the fields, and the cattle barns are empty, 18yet I will rejoice in the Lord! I will be joyful in the God of my salvation! 19The eSovereign Lord is my strength! He makes me as surefooted as a deer, able to tread upon the heights.




October 24, 2016, 9:01 AM

Why is the Good stuff always the Hardest?



I feel like (and this is selfishness talking here) that Jesus could have made the REALLY important stuff we are supposed to do as Christians a whole lot easier.  Forgiveness is really, really difficult.  No matter how well you forgive a wrong, forgetting it is another matter all together.  Repentance is really, really difficult.  Habits are hard to break for a reason, we're built with them in our very nature and fiber as beings.  So stopping one is not an easy prospect.  

Confession, thats an awkward and uncomfortable prospect.  Peacemaking means we get thrown under the bus at times, not being able to fully realize the fruit of our efforts (of having them be reciprocated even).  

Why is all this stuff, the IMPORTANT stuff, really difficult?  Well, Selfish Chris, its not difficult.  You've made it difficult.  

We have trained ourselves to avoid something that makes us look less.  Can you imagine if someone labeled you "James - the Less" today?  We'd have a fit!  The act of Confession means we've made a mistake in which we need to take accountability.  Forgiveness means we need to put ourselves second, shuffle our priorities to include those of others.  Peacemaking means we dont get to say those witty comebacks we've been practicing in the shower.  

We've been trained to THRIVE in those moments that make ourselves bigger, stronger, more dominant.  Jesus calls us to the back of the line, to the bottom rung of the ladder... to the places where confession, repentance, and forgiveness THRIVE.  

For me, golf is difficult.  You know why?  Because I've played it twice in my life.  I know that if I played it regularly, I'd get better... exponentially.  Maybe forgiveness and confession are so hard for us because we've never really done them.  I bet if we try, and practice the characteristics of Jesus more they wouldn't be so difficult.  In fact, I bet the Church could get pretty good at them.  

 




October 17, 2016, 8:56 AM

Honestly...



Honesty.  Honesty is a dangerous trait, not to mention very uncomfortable to encounter.  We tend to like the glossed over, sugar coated, quick hit responses to life.  "How are you?" "Fine."  "Good to hear, see you later!"  

Sunday morning (or whenever you gather for a worship service) is no exception to the rule.  We like the glossed over, comforting messages of a community that looks like it has it all together.  Yes we're a flawed people with sinful natures... just don't show it when we're all dressed nicer than average and sitting in orderly rows preparing to worship and commune with our Creator.  

Then David shows up in the Psalms.  And boy is he honest.  We hear him cry out in anguish, we hear him shout with joy.  He questions God, he accuses God, he feels abandoned by God, and we read it all.  He holds nothing back from how he feels and how he communicates that to his Father, OUR Father.  Do you ever want to look up to God and say: "He doesn't speak for me necessarily! I think you're doing a great job!"  

We are uncomfortable with that level of honesty, not that it would surprise God.  He's seen and heard it all before, not to mention seeing fit to have it printed for all time in the text of the Psalms.  Truthfully, I think we think God only wants to hear the exaltations and the "We're fine, thanks for asking" songs from us.  We choose inspirational snippets of text to adorn our walls and Bible-covers.  

David's honesty is the first step (in my opinion) to true worship and forming a purer relationship with God.  His heart is contrite, he holds nothing back ("I am a worm...").  Confession and repentance are foundational pieces of David's character.  Are they even the tiniest portion of our character?  

We cant pretend to have it all together on the outside, worshipping with "abandon" while writhing in agony internally.  God does not desire those types of sacrifices.  He wants a contrite (Honest) heart, profession a desperate need for his strength, compassion, and mercy.  That is the first step in finding ourselves immersed in Worship.  The first steps towards becoming a people after God's own heart.  

Psalm 13: 1 - 3

O Lord, how long will you forget me? Forever?
    How long will you look the other way?
How long must I struggle with anguish in my soul,
    with sorrow in my heart every day?
    How long will my enemy have the upper hand?

Turn and answer me, O Lord my God!
    Restore the sparkle to my eyes, or I will die.




October 10, 2016, 10:00 AM

Coming home to a clean house



We just got back from a trip North and there is something relevant here I wanted to write about:  Coming home to a clean house. 

I need to be transparent here:  I do not like cleaning up.  BUT I like coming home to a messy house after a vacation even less, so cleaning is the plan.  However, I need you to know that my definition of cleaning up is WAY different than those with higher standards (my wife).  For me, a room is clean if I can stand in a doorway and not see the mess.  No, I do not condone sweeping things under the rug, but I'm usually pretty content with toys in the right pile, and general orderliness. 

That doesnt usually work though, and only adds to the general disorder of things when someone with standards actually tries to clean up after me.  Their eyes are trained to see the mess, seek out the dust in the corners and leave the room actually.........clean.  Whereas I like to leave the room.......... sort of clean. 

Do you wonder if thats what Jesus sees when he looks at us?  He is coming back.  That is truth.  We have staked our entire faith existence on the fact that we know he's coming back.  What is he going to find?  His standards are high.  The dark corners WILL be exposed and any things we've swept under the rug will be brought into the light.  

Are we still trying to keep those habits and sins in the dark, where we think they'll never see the light of day?  Do we live as though we'll have another day to tidy up?  I'm not one for doom and gloom, but there's a reality that has to be faced concerning our laziness for confession and repentance.  "It will wait..." "There's always tomorrow... (insert the rest of the Annie lyrics here)."  

There is NOT tomorrow.  There is no time to wait.  Jesus' message to his disciples was to face those dark corners immediately and to not fall into the trap of the Pharisees (whom took pride in their outward appearance but were ignorant to the darkness inside).  

The time for sweeping up is now. 

 




September 26, 2016, 10:51 AM

Another Thought on Strength...



Big Question:  If the promise of Heaven or the threat of Hell were stripped away… how would you live?  

Would your life continue to be defined by such concepts as integrity, or generosity?  Would your character change if you knew you weren't “storing up treasure?”  This answer, at least in one instance, was answered with the behavior of Moses after on of his brief forays into impatience with the stubbornness of Israel.  He is told he will not enter the Promised Land.  

The carrot was taken from the end of his stick, he was left to wander the remainder of the 40 years in the wilderness with no relief in sight.  Everyone else would eventually make it into Canaan… he would not.  He now dealt with the transgressions, complaining, and general whininess of the people for NOTHING!!!!  (yes, I’m speaking from a lower story perspective).

But he continues to lead.  He continues to stand between God and man.  He continues to walk Israel closer and closer to the promise he will never receive. Why? 

Because there is so much more to how we love God than just our words or songs.  There must be action, response, and movement involved.  Moses kept walking.  

How ‘bout us?  Would we continue?  

I think we’ve got the Heart and Soul of love well handled.  Well, to be honest, there are industries built upon our grasp of the heart and soul of love:  Christian Music, Worship groups, Christian Radio.  Every one of those resources gives us countless ways to connect with the emotional and internal aspects of God.  If that were enough, well, things would be a lot easier.  

James takes that issue on with his letter late in the New Testament — James 2: 14; 17  What good is it, dear brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but don't show it by your actions? Can't that kind of faith save anyone?… 17 So you see, faith by itself isn't enough.  Unless it produces good deeds, it is dead and useless. 

We could explain away Moses’ actions as dedication or integrity… but that would not be giving him enough credit.  He added the strength into loving God.  Does your life exhibit strength in your walk?  Or are we content with singing a happy song and leaving the loving to emotional outpouring? The world needs us to serve.  It doesn't have to be leading a nation into freedom… it may be loving one person through a empty tank of gas.  One small movement at a time leads us to our own Mt. Nebo…… and peace.  But only if we add every ounce of our strength to worship and faith.  




September 19, 2016, 8:09 AM

Maybe John Lennon was right...



You may recall that in 1966 John Lennon of the Beatles made an infamous remark that had dire consequences here in the US.  He said:  "We're (the Beatles) more popular than Jesus, now."   There is much more to the quote, in which he is discussing the diminishing influence of Christianity in the UK which makes the statement less potent and controversial.  But the entire statement wasn't printed five months later here in the US, only the quote that the Beatles were bigger than Jesus.  

Lets look at the whole quote:  "Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn't argue about that; I'm right and I'll be proved right. We're more popular than Jesus now; I don't know which will go first—rock 'n' roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It's them twisting it that ruins it for me."  The London Evening Star - "How Does a Beatle Live?" -- March 4, 1966.

It was the response received in the United States that pushed the Beatles to extinction, no longer performing live shows and becoming a studio-only band.  Taken out of context, they deserved every bit of anger... it is an egotistical and arrogant statement to make.  Within its context, there should be a higher level of alarm... 

Because he's right... in a sense.  

The world wins in the popularity contest.  Sacrificial living is not the norm, nor does it get the press like living large, living the American dream.  This is not to say that the Church will ever fade, that is not going to happen.  But it needs said that we've let the world win our hearts, even if we count on Jesus handling our souls.  

The ordinary people around Jesus did make his message a little harder to hear.  Peter was denying him; John was declaring that Jesus loved him best; Thomas doubted...  Not to mention what disciples and followers of Jesus have done to his name in the centuries that have followed.  Why would the world, unbelievers choose the Church over money, or comfort?  We dont. 

Jesus is not worried about the results of a popularity contest, he never was or will be.  It seems like the Church has become satisfied with being Runner-Up though.  That only changes when we do, when we shift allegiance to this failing world onto the hope that lasts eternal.  

Luke 9: 23 - 26  23 Then he said to the crowd, “If any of you wants to be my follower, you must turn from your selfish ways, take up your cross daily, and follow me. 24 If you try to hang on to your life, you will lose it. But if you give up your life for my sake, you will save it. 25 And what do you benefit if you gain the whole world but are yourself lost or destroyed? 26 If anyone is ashamed of me and my message, the Son of Man will be ashamed of that person when he returns in his glory and in the glory of the Father and the holy angels. 

 




September 12, 2016, 8:13 AM

Hot or Cold isnt the same as Conservative or Liberal **



That's a mouthful.  Especially for a blog title that's supposed to grab our attention and quickly dispense a point.  But I'm sticking with it.  I read a social media post this past Saturday evening that refuses to let me be, so I'm using this format to discuss it a bit with you.  My political knowledge and leanings are minimal at best... mostly I'm annoyed at how the election high jacks the news for months and months on end.  In other words, I am not going to blow your mind with some political insight.  

I do want to talk about how it affects our faith though, or at least how it affects our behavior.  Its a hot topic for sure, and some buzz words come forward every four years that "help" us determine which side we stand on:  Liberal and Conservative.  At the very core, those are decent enough descriptors for political leanings... and I would say I lean definitely towards what is typically the conservative stance.  

However... However... the words are being abused greatly; With one being almost solely used to describe one political party or another.  Once you are labeled as one, there's no changing or going back without repercussions.  It like voting the party line, selecting the box for all Republicans or Democrats on the ballot.  There's no room for real action there.  

How about those labels when it comes to our belief systems?  It is inherently assumed that the conservative outlook is the biblical stance.  And liberal is the worldly or errant place to be.  To quote the article I've read:  "there is nothing Spiritual, in and of itself, of conservative or liberal position on anything." **  We want to prove ourselves literate and subject to scriptural doctrine....... but what if we've missed the point based on our concern more to be conservative than actually act like Jesus?

Let me explain that last thought:  Jesus and the Pharisees were quite similar, and had a lot in common.  I am guilty of making them the butt of a joke, or antagonists in a lesson.  Their contributions to faith and religion cannot be overlooked.  Without them, Christianity would not have had the foundation for growth, nor the political shelter to operate freely within the Roman occupation.  They were instrumental to the birth and growth of the Christian movement...... even if they fought it.  

One could establish (quite convincingly) that they were the conservative arm of the faith system.  They protected the Law, down to the letter.  Entering the scene was a man who challenged some of that system, pushing its limits at every turn.  Why?  Why did he do this?  Was it to enrage them to the point of playing their part in his crucifixion?  No.  Was it to play a political card, challenging the established order of things within Roman occupation?  No.  Was it simply to be different?  No.  

Jesus was labeled "liberal" because instead of pushing Law he pushed Love.  And that made him a raging liberal.  He challenged their system by including everyone.  He challenged their ideas of what purity meant by touching the untouchable, healing sinners, and dining with the outcasts.  Everything he did pushed his agenda:  Love.  Now lets not get confused here, he did not come to abolish the Law.  He held to the Temple rules for purity... he just didnt extend them beyond those walls.  (Washing hands, utensils, etc...).  

We need a new position, or party to stand with:  Jesus.  And we need a new agenda:  love.  

** inspired by thoughts from Bobby Valentine, 09/09




September 12, 2016, 8:12 AM

Hot or Cold isnt the same as Conservative or Liberal **



That's a mouthful.  Especially for a blog title that's supposed to grab our attention and quickly dispense a point.  But I'm sticking with it.  I read a social media post this past Saturday evening that refuses to let me be, so I'm using this format to discuss it a bit with you.  My political knowledge and leanings are minimal at best... mostly I'm annoyed at how the election high jacks the news for months and months on end.  In other words, I am not going to blow your mind with some political insight.  

I do want to talk about how it affects our faith though, or at least how it affects our behavior.  Its a hot topic for sure, and some buzz words come forward every four years that "help" us determine which side we stand on:  Liberal and Conservative.  At the very core, those are decent enough descriptors for political leanings... and I would say I lean definitely towards what is typically the conservative stance.  

However... However... the words are being abused greatly; With one being almost solely used to describe one political party or another.  Once you are labeled as one, there's no changing or going back without repercussions.  It like voting the party line, selecting the box for all Republicans or Democrats on the ballot.  There's no room for real action there.  

How about those labels when it comes to our belief systems?  It is inherently assumed that the conservative outlook is the biblical stance.  And liberal is the worldly or errant place to be.  To quote the article I've read:  "there is nothing Spiritual, in and of itself, of conservative or liberal position on anything." **  We want to prove ourselves literate and subject to scriptural doctrine....... but what if we've missed the point based on our concern more to be conservative than actually act like Jesus?

Let me explain that last thought:  Jesus and the Pharisees were quite similar, and had a lot in common.  I am guilty of making them the butt of a joke, or antagonists in a lesson.  Their contributions to faith and religion cannot be overlooked.  Without them, Christianity would not have had the foundation for growth, nor the political shelter to operate freely within the Roman occupation.  They were instrumental to the birth and growth of the Christian movement...... even if they fought it.  

One could establish (quite convincingly) that they were the conservative arm of the faith system.  They protected the Law, down to the letter.  Entering the scene was a man who challenged some of that system, pushing its limits at every turn.  Why?  Why did he do this?  Was it to enrage them to the point of playing their part in his crucifixion?  No.  Was it to play a political card, challenging the established order of things within Roman occupation?  No.  Was it simply to be different?  No.  

Jesus was labeled "liberal" because instead of pushing Law he pushed Love.  And that made him a raging liberal.  He challenged their system by including everyone.  He challenged their ideas of what purity meant by touching the untouchable, healing sinners, and dining with the outcasts.  Everything he did pushed his agenda:  Love.  Now lets not get confused here, he did not come to abolish the Law.  He held to the Temple rules for purity... he just didnt extend them beyond those walls.  (Washing hands, utensils, etc...).  

We need a new position, or party to stand with:  Jesus.  And we need a new agenda:  love.  

** inspired by thoughts from Bobby Valentine, 09/09




August 29, 2016, 8:47 AM

A Lost Artform



Encouragement.  

I'm in the office chewing on the thoughts presented excellently in yesterday's sermon by Dan Dozier (08/28).  Why is Barnabas so important to the story?  Because the art of encouragement has been nearly lost.  

How much easier is it to offer criticism or complaint?  So much so that we've created extra words to justify our complaints and criticisms: "Constructive Criticism."  When we add the extra to it, we feel like we're actually helping and not piling our own frustrations on our target. Nevermind the source of criticism, there are so many dark places we hold tightly too that breed negativity.  What is concerning is the lack of restraint and filter present in the lives and hearts of Christians that should catch those comments before they make their way to the vocal chords.   

I'm not pushing an environment in which complaints are never spoken, or concerns get left unattended to.  Every organization needs to face its failings and shortcomings.  What concerns me as I chew on the topic is the lack of concern shown towards individuals, the lack of restraint we show towards someone we disagree with.  I've created a new Rule for Life in the past few years:  Avoid the "Comments" section anywhere on the internet.  Within the anonymity of the internet, people unleash every hateful and spiteful word they can think of into any and every situation.  2016 has been a hotbed of attacks towards individuals both for both good and bad actions (and I'm not even thinking of the election yet!). 

How important does Barnabas become right here, right now?  We need him.  Desperately.  Instead of leading with "what I dont like about....", Barnabas lead with hope, loyalty, and love.  Without those we would not have the Gospel of Mark.  Without those, John Mark might have fallen to the wayside after Paul's rejection of him.  I'm not taking sides in that dispute, I'm simply pointing to the power of Barnabas' actions.  

Have you taken the role of Barnabas?  Or are we more comfortable putting people in their place and letting someone else mop up the mess?  We shouldnt even need to have this conversation at Church, or in the Christian realm at all.  But here we are.  The world needs encouragement, your family and friends need Barnabas.  Is that you?  

Acts 11: 22 - 26 22When the church at Jerusalem heard what had happened, they sent Barnabas to Antioch.23When he arrived and saw this evidence of God’s blessing, he was filled with joy, and he encouraged the believers to stay true to the Lord.24Barnabas was a good man, full of the Holy Spirit and strong in faith. And many people were brought to the Lord.

25Then Barnabas went on to Tarsus to look for Saul.26When he found him, he brought him back to Antioch. Both of them stayed there with the church for a full year, teaching large crowds of people. (It was at Antioch that the believers were first called Christians.)

 




August 22, 2016, 8:57 AM

On Principle...



Ever had someone discipline you, or throw something back in your face simple “on principle?”  Its a way of saying: “I’m doing this because of the principles that drive me to action.”  If you act unjustly, its justice that drive the principles of discipline.  If you act immorally, its the principles of morality that are lost.  If you suffer because of the state of the economy, its those financial principles that govern you.  We are driven by our principles.  See this definition:

principle

--noun--

1 a fundamental truth or proposition that serves as the foundation for a system of belief or behavior or for a chain of reasoning 

     Dare I ask what serves as the foundation for your system of belief or behavior for a chain of reasoning?  

During the Revolutionary War, it was the principle of freedom for all man that kept our young nation believing in the Cause.  What guides you to get our of bed each morning?  What drives you in the decisions you make financially?  What pushes you to decide which way to go individually?  As a family?  As the Body of Christ?  

    Church, we must find ourselves governed by the example and words of Jesus Christ.  Sure, there is nothing in the Bible about which TV shows to watch.  There is nothing in the Bible about whether or not we should allow our children to date.  We face cultural battles every day, with a world that is changing faster than we can keep up with.  The Bible does address something very important though:  our identity.  When we base our identity on the words and example of Jesus Christ we will be guided by a principle that allows for cultural change, for modern thought, for growth and adaptability.  When you make your principles this: 

Matthew 22: 37 - 40

There is nothing that will fall outside your Bible frame of perspective!!! 

--Why should I give?  Simply on principle. 

--Why should I love?  Simply on principle. 

--Why should I engage this world with an attitude that states that I don’t belong here and therefore will not cling to its laws, its chains, and its beliefs?  SIMPLY ON PRINCIPLE!! 

Lets find ourselves burdened with the compassion of Jesus.  Lets find ourselves taking this world by storm…. Simply on Principle.  

Stop chaining yourself to the past, to your faults, to others expectations… Grow into the expectations (and principles) of Jesus Christ.  

Matthew 22: 37 - 40  37Jesus replied, “ ‘You must love the LORD your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your mind.’38This is the first and greatest commandment.39A second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’40The entire law and all the demands of the prophets are based on these two commandments.”




August 15, 2016, 8:40 AM

For Man or For God?



I've spent time these past few weeks with Paul, reading his letters and thinking about his life. It is unique in the sense that we get nearly all of his time in ministry chronicled for us.  We get to read his personal letters and get glimpses into his faults and encouragements.  Even when he is under arrest and chained to a Roman guard, Paul lets us in.  I want to try and sum up his life in one statement: 

He lived every moment to the satisfaction of God.  

Sounds nice doesn't it?  It would make a pretty good book that sets our hearts at ease and puts a smile on our face to think that we too could live that way.  But it isn't a good book, nor does it have a pretty cover.  You wont find Paul's "Living for God" book in the self-help section.  You'll find it amongst the books dedicated to the martyrs.  

Unless we're teaching a series on them, we typically avoid those shelves.  Paul lived every moment for God, and not for man.  Now, that is not to say that he didn't struggle and sin; we get a first-person confession of those moments from Paul.  Every time though, just like with David, there is repentance and forgiveness.  So even in those moments of failure and sin, he is clearly focused on God.  

Here's the point:  Who do you want to please more: Man or God?  

Our voices on Sunday morning sing songs of praise and allegiance to God...  our lives and actions speak of different allegiances.  This is not a call to drop everything and run to a 3rd world country.  This is NOT a call to drop a career and head to seminary.  This IS a call to live and breathe the Gospel of Jesus Christ.  When Paul met Priscilla and Aquilla, they were making tents.  He didn't come into their lives by standing on a street corner with a bullhorn, he worked with them.  His influence through that process brought us powerful members of the missional community.  

Paul lived for God, his audience of One.  That meant there were people who didn't agree with Paul.  He was ok with that.  That meant there were people who wanted Paul out of the picture.  He was ok with that.  Paul had people actively teaching against his teaching.  He was ok with that.  His audience was God, and that was who he was trying to please. 

For God, or for Man?  Who is your audience? 

Philippians 1: 20 - 22   20 For I fully expect and hope that I will never be ashamed, but that I will continue to be bold for Christ, as I have been in the past. And I trust that my life will bring honor to Christ, whether I live or die. 21 For to me, living means living for Christ, and dying is even better. 22 But if I live, I can do more fruitful work for Christ. So I really don’t know which is better




August 8, 2016, 9:47 AM

Why Saul isnt the Main Character in His Own Conversion Story



I, like everyone else who occupies a 21st Century Church, owe a lot of thanks to Paul.  He embraced his calling and vision and literally ran with it to the end.  Because of his work, we are who we are.  Thank You Paul, you deserve the three chapters in The Story... But I'm done talking about you.  

We need to look closely at Ananias.  Closely, expertly, taking in the details and emulating him.  Simply put:  We are called like Ananias and not like Paul.  Yes, there are exceptions, and those people make the best of their calling to missions.  The rest of us have our feet planted where they're planted... And we are not without a powerful calling.  

"GO!  Go to Straight Street and lift up the man sent here to drag you away in chains."  Ananias was called to love someone, plain and simple.  Ever wonder what God is calling you to do in your life?  Look no further than Acts 9.  Dont skip over the parts where Saul is cowering alone in a house.  Look for him sitting there blind, hungry, despondent...  And then look for the person who helps him.  

The trouble is, until God takes the matter into his own hands, no one helps Saul.  No One.  FOR THREE DAYS.  

Saul was praying.  Saul was begging.  Saul was hurting.  And no one helped him.  Ever hear the parable of the Good Samaritan?  Boom, life imitating art right there.  Every one of us walked on the other side of the road.  Now we have good reason/excuse to do so, there was no way to be sure once Saul was set on his feet that we wouldn't lash out again.  No one wanted to be the one to restore a tyrant to strength.  
But the calling of every Christ-follower was ignored for those days: Love.  Seek out those who need compassion, food, water, clothing and attend to them.  The crux of our salvation rests on us reaching our hands out the Saul (Matthew 25).  Everything rests on our ministering to him... and we walk on the other side of the street.  

The calling of Ananias is our calling.  Have you heard it? 

Acts 9: 10 - 16 10 Now there was a believer[b] in Damascus named Ananias. The Lord spoke to him in a vision, calling, “Ananias!”

“Yes, Lord!” he replied. 11 The Lord said, “Go over to Straight Street, to the house of Judas. When you get there, ask for a man from Tarsus named Saul. He is praying to me right now. 12 I have shown him a vision of a man named Ananias coming in and laying hands on him so he can see again.”

13 “But Lord,” exclaimed Ananias, “I’ve heard many people talk about the terrible things this man has done to the believers[c] in Jerusalem! 14 And he is authorized by the leading priests to arrest everyone who calls upon your name.”

15 But the Lord said, “Go, for Saul is my chosen instrument to take my message to the Gentiles and to kings, as well as to the people of Israel. 16 And I will show him how much he must suffer for my name’s sake.”

 




August 1, 2016, 8:03 AM

The biggest hurdle to reaching the world...



Is us.  

Our ego, our pride is the biggest hurdle for the world receiving the Gospel.  Its a hard lesson, but we've been prepping for this moment from the very beginning of The Story.  The Kingdom of God, the kingdom that Jesus was preparing us for in his time here was placed in the hands of the apostles... and it took serious power to overcome their pride and ego.  They were critical of his decisions to go into Samaria, every Jew was.  Peter, even after witnessing firsthand the power of the Holy Spirit and receiving a vision from God that Gentiles are ok, struggles with reaching out to Cornelius and his family. 

After Peter (PETER!!  The cornerstone of the new movement, THE most visible apostle) did this he was dragged before a council to answer for his actions.  Yes, he had to explain himself for responding to God and the Holy Spirit's promptings.  He had to explain that he saw God move in the dogs of Samaria.  While Peter's ego was taken care of (look into his letters later in the New Testament to see the change of his heart!), the majority struggled with the concept of the Gospel being for everyone.    

Are we fighting the same battle?  Yes, the Gospel is for us.  Yes, the entire story was written and acted out for us.  Yes, we have received the gift of Salvation from the Cross.  And yes, so it was our neighbors and enemies.  Across the street, around the corner, on Saturday evenings and Sunday mornings... All receive the same gift we have.  

Imagine the impact on the world if we put our own pride aside and went into the corners of our own personal Samaria.  




July 25, 2016, 9:12 AM

Surprise!



In The Story - Adult Study book, Randy Frazee uses the example of a Jack-in-the-Box in his introduction to this week's chapter study.  I immediately related to this because I am both fascinated by the fact that they still make those toys, and their popularity throughout history.  You are basically paying to be scared.  If you watch the movie: Elf you know how I feel about them!   What's interesting is that we keep cranking the handle, listening to the music, and jump a little bit when the top pops open... EVEN THOUGH we know exactly what is going to happen!  

I think there is a similar reaction every year/time we talk about the Resurrection.  We know the story, we know what is going to happen, and yet we act surprised when it plays out the exact way we expected.  The Resurrection is more than just a good annual sermon topic, or something we use to make Easter special... it is THE reason we have hope.  Death was defeated, and that changes everything.  

We need to stop cranking the handle and wondering if the same thing happens this time through the Gospels.  I dont want to see the Church handle the Good News like the disciples did in John 20.  They hid behind locked doors AFTER they met Jesus... Fear ruled them.  When he shows up on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, they are surprised (just like a Jack-in-the-Box).  

We serve a living Savior.  Living.  Alive.  Powerful.  

That changes us...  Now let go of the handle and live a resurrected life. 

Acts 1: 6 - 11 So when they had come together, they asked him, “Lord, will you at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?” He said to them, “It is not for you to know times or seasons that the Father has fixed by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.” And when he had said these things, as they were looking on, he was lifted up, and a cloud took him out of their sight. 10 And while they were gazing into heaven as he went, behold, two men stood by them in white robes, 11 and said, “Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking into heaven? This Jesus, who was taken up from you into heaven, will come in the same way as you saw him go into heaven.”




July 18, 2016, 8:40 AM

The Path of Least Resistance



Lets not start this blog entry with any confusion: I am lazy.  I do not like pain.  I actively work to avoid pain and work to keep things as streamlined and efficient as possible.   Making that clear is important because what we're talking about this morning is going to sound a lot like an angry soapbox rant.  It isn't.  This is for me as well. 

      The American Dream has replaced/stolen the heart of Christianity.  

We used to be about compassion, generosity, service, accepting the marginalized, and caring for the poor.  Now we're about bigger buildings, being blessed, comfort, and material wealth.  (Yes, those are blanket statements... forgive me for needing to make a big splash here).  
    I say "we" and "used to" in the prior sentence in light of the professed model for our movement today: the First Century Church.  Back then the movement was about inclusion (Gentiles) and meeting the needs of the group over the individual.  Today we cant seem to get Black and White churches together for more than a 5th Sunday Singing.  

The American Dream has become our mantra, goal, and vision.  (I feel the need to repeat: I am guilty of this...).  We push to make our buildings more comfortable for the upper class, which automatically makes it uncomfortable for the lower class.  The nicer we look the more they stick out.  We dont want challenged to push our boundaries of love and generosity, we want to be secure in our blessings and made to be hopeful that rich people CAN enter the Kingdom of Heaven.  

We want America to be great again, but only if it means we get our power back.  We want the political system to work FOR us instead of equally between us and those we label as tax collectors and sinners (there's some First Century Church for ya!).  In other words, we want the path of least resistance.  We want to be accepted, appreciated, welcomed, empowered, and universally loved without having to earn it.    

The path of Christ, the path of his followers walks in another direction.  Exclusion, suspicion,  alienation, and pain.  Now it isn't always this dreary of an outlook.  Joy and Peace are two great promises we've been given... but remember those come no matter the circumstance.  

America is already great.  It never ceased to be great.  But lets not get confused in this politically charged landscape:  We are citizens of a greater place, and mere aliens here.  

1 Peter 2: 11 - 12  11 Dear friends, I warn you as “temporary residents and foreigners” to keep away from worldly desires that wage war against your very souls. 12 Be careful to live properly among your unbelieving neighbors. Then even if they accuse you of doing wrong, they will see your honorable behavior, and they will give honor to God when he judges the world.


Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9   
Contents © 2018 Red Bridge Church of Christ | Church Website Provided by mychurchwebsite.net | Privacy Policy