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April 2, 2017, 1:13 PM

Camping... blech


I have memories of camping from my younger years.  They're not good memories, so we'll just leave them there.  But I want to talk about the idea of camping... more so the idea of preparing to go camping. 

If you haven't gone camping, good for you... let's just leave it at that.  If you have gone camping, you probably will understand what I'm talking about.  Camping requires WORK! A LOT of work.  And that's BEFORE you even get in the car.  Because when you go camping you have to prepare for every contingency and every possible event happening.  If you don't prepare and take it with you, you either go without or find yourself fashioning a windbreak/rain cover from dead branches and beetle carcasses. Then there are the basic human necessities of life.  If you don't prepare for those before camping... well, we won't talk about that. 

And THEN you have to figure out how to get all that stuff in the car along with the family, the dog, and the bikes.  All that so you can be a "Happy Camper."  

No thanks. 

Here's my point, which I hope is a lot simpler than my description of camping:  Being prayerful and worshipful requires work and effort to make happen.  You need to prepare accordingly, because if you forget or get too busy or don't prepare you will find yourself either overwhelmed by what the world throws at you, or you'll be so unprepared that you give up within minutes of trying to counter whatever it is that has distracted you.  When Jesus speaks of a life lived in accordance with his words and teachings, he likens it to building a house.  I've not built my own house, but I've seen them built. It doesn't happen in a day, or even a week.  Building a lifestyle of prayer and worship takes time.  But it is time you MUST invest or you will be washed away when the storms come.  And they will come.  

Be prepared.  Practice a lifestyle of prayer and worship... And make sure you pack bug spray. 




March 27, 2017, 8:42 AM

Nouns and Verbs


The English language is confusing.  There-Their-They're.  Four-For-Fore.  Two-To-Too.  You get the point. Amidst all the messiness of figuring language out however, there is one concept we should have no problem with: Nouns vs. Verbs. 

A Noun = a person, place, thing, or idea. 
A Verb = Action!  

If you need to go back to Schoolhouse Rock, do so now.  (Verb, that's what's happening!). 

We start with that groovy language lesson because it is essential we remember the difference between the two concepts. And even more importantly, that we PRACTICE the difference between the two.  I believe dcTalk said it best when they told us: "Luv is a verb."  (YAY! for bonus links and 80's videos).  

Worship, our topic yesterday in the Believe series (03/26/17), needs redefinition and classification.  Do you treat it as a Noun or a Verb? I am guilty of doing both, but I fear a leaning towards the Noun.  "We're headed to Worship today."  Now that can be both, but we are most likely dictating that it means a specific place and time in that sentence.  Think about this: Do you use that sentence on ANY other day than Sunday?  Doubtful.  Therefore, it has become a noun. 

Worship, while grounded in music and song, is not a scheduled event or something that fits in our busy schedules.  It is a lifestyle, much in the way we're instructed to make prayer a living part of our being.  (1 Thessalonians 5: 16 - 17).  So which will it be?  Noun or Verb? 

Lets figure out a way to make this sentence: "We're going to Worship today" something that fits EVERY day, not just Sunday. 

Psalm 95: 1 - 7 1Come, let us sing to the Lord! Let us shout joyfully to the Rock of our salvation. 2Let us come to him with thanksgiving. Let us sing psalms of praise to him. 3For the Lord is a great God, a great King above all gods. 4He holds in his hands the depths of the earth and the mightiest mountains. 5The sea belongs to him, for he made it. His hands formed the dry land, too. 6Come, let us worship and bow down. Let us kneel before the Lord our maker, 7for he is our God. We are the people he watches over, the flock under his care.




March 13, 2017, 8:53 AM

Boil it All Down


I watched an interesting and disturbing video this week about what happens when you boil Coca-Cola down so that all that remains is the sugar.  The video wanted to show the comparison of sugar content between regular Coke and Coke Zero.  Yikes (the picture attached is the end result with Coke on the left, Coke Zero on the right). 

In the time-lapse video a 20 oz bottle of Coke was heated so that all the water evaporated, what was left was a thick sludge of caramel-colored sugar.  That was what remained when all the extra was cooked off.  Sugar.  Lots and Lots of sugar.  The whole point of the video was to enlighten us why drinking sugary beverages is BAD.  Point taken.  

Here's a thought that we can pull from a science-y video like that:  what will remain of us if all the extra was taken away?  What would be left to show the world after the layers and layers of disguises, hobbies, pursuits, and titles are stripped away?  The heart of Jesus' teaching is for us to strip away those layers and expose our very soul to the world.  Think about the bullet points from the Sermon on the Mount: Don't even be angry with someone; Don't even have lust in your heart; Where your treasure is, there also will your heart be.  Jesus is boiling layers away, layers that we use to disguise the sludge we keep inside.  

Who are the blessed ones in the Beatitudes?  Those who are stripped down to the bare bones of grief, dependence, persecution, humility, and contentment.  What will expose this world to the light of Christ?  Our very lives when the baskets are pulled off, creating a light for everyone to see.  

What remains when the mask is removed?  Is it love?  Faith?  Hope?  Paul speaks of those elements that last for eternity, while everything else fades with the passing of time.  Take a look at the Cross this week.  In those final moments, Jesus was stripped of everything this earth could offer him.  Clothes were ripped off and gambled over; Skin flayed from bone; Dignity destroyed by false accusations and mocking captors.  And in those moments of exposure, he offered compassion.  He forgives us for our betrayal.  He welcomes a thief into paradise because of a kind word. He seeks to protect his mother and friends.  What everything boiled down to was love. 

Are we being transformed into his likeness?  Can we allow our earthly pursuits and passions to be boiled away into the insignificant vapors they are? Don't grasp too carefully to something that will evaporate in the heat of judgment.  

Matt 6: 31 - 34   31“So don’t worry about these things, saying, ‘What will we eat? What will we drink? What will we wear?’32These things dominate the thoughts of unbelievers, but your heavenly Father already knows all your needs.33Seek the Kingdom of God above all else, and live righteously, and he will give you everything you need.

34“So don’t worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring its own worries. Today’s trouble is enough for today.




February 27, 2017, 8:51 AM

Looking Like Jesus


Here is the story that I didn't use in the sermon time yesterday that you need to hear:  

In his book Messy Spirituality, Mike Yaconelli tells the story of a guy who was once mistaken for someone. His name was Daryl, and he was a new volunteer youth worker at his church. During their monthly nursing home visit, Daryl leaned against the back wall between two residents of the home who were in wheelchairs. At the end of the service, someone grabbed Daryl's hand. Startled, Daryl looked down and saw a very old, very frail, and an obviously very alone man. The man had no expression on his face, and his mouth hung open. Daryl doubted the man could hear or see anything at all.

As everyone got ready to leave, Daryl realized that he didn't want to leave the old man. Caught off guard by his feelings, Daryl leaned over and whispered, "I'm, uh, sorry that I have to go, but I'll be back. I promise."
Without warning the man squeezed Daryl's hand and then let go. On his way out the door, Daryl heard himself say to the old man, "I love you," and he thought, Where did that come from?

Daryl became a regular at the nursing home visits. Each month it was the same routine. Daryl would sit in the back next to Oliver, the old man, and hold his hand. At the end of the service, Daryl would say, "I'm sorry I have to go, but I'll be back next month. I love you." Oliver would squeeze Daryl's hand, and then Daryl would leave.

On Daryl's sixth visit the service started without Oliver. Daryl recognized that it sometimes took the nurses a while to get everyone wheeled out to the program. But halfway through the service Daryl became alarmed. He went to the nurses' station and was led to Oliver's room. In his 42 years of life Daryl had never before seen someone dying, but he could tell that Oliver was near death. Slowly he walked to the side of the bed and grabbed Oliver's hand. When Oliver didn't respond, tears filled Daryl's eyes.

It wasn't long before the youth director stood in the doorway to tell Daryl it was time to leave. An emotional Daryl said to Oliver, "I'm sorry, Oliver, I have to go. I love you." Just then Daryl felt a slight squeeze. Oliver had responded!
Tears flowed as Daryl stumbled out of the room, almost bumping into a young woman in the doorway. He said to her, "I'm sorry, I didn't see you." She responded, "It's all right, I've been waiting to see you. I'm Oliver's granddaughter. He's dying, you know."

"Yeah, I know," Daryl sadly responded.

Oliver's granddaughter went on to explain that she and her grandfather were very close. When the doctors told her he was dying, she came immediately. As she was with him the night before, he'd woken up, alert and bright-eyed, and asked her for a favor. He said, "Can you say goodbye to Jesus for me?"
Confused, she said, "But, Grandpa, I don't need to say goodbye to Jesus for you. He'll be the next person you see." Then Oliver closed his eyes, smiled mischievously, and said, "You don't understand. Jesus comes to see me every month, and He might not know I've gone."

Those were Oliver's last words.
Oliver's granddaughter asked the nurses what he meant. That's when they told her about the youth group that came and the guy who held her grandpa's hand. Then she said to Daryl, "I never thought of Jesus being as chubby and as bald as you, but I imagine that Jesus is very glad to have had you be mistaken for Him."*

I would love for everyone from Red Bridge to be mistaken for Jesus this week.  Live his character, live his words and actions, BE the Church and Body of Christ.  

*Adapted from Mike Yaconelli, Messy Spirituality, (Grand Rapids, M.I.: Zondervan, 2002), pp. 103-105.




February 20, 2017, 10:16 AM

Ordering Pizza... The delivery man cometh


I'm an expert at ordering pizza.  I can push a few buttons on my phone (using the app of course, who wants to actually call and order something?) and pizza will magically show up at my door.  Once I ordered pizza and the delivery person never showed.  My life was ruined.  

We are also experts at praying for God to work in us, for us, or through us.  But expect it all to be done without us.  

We've begun to treat God like a delivery man...  we pray, he shows up.  We never leave the couch. 

Remember Israel's 400 years of captivity?  They prayed for deliverance.   Cried out for generations to be freed.  When God showed up (amazingly and powerfully), they complained about how much work it took to be delivered.  

A simple point that is sourced in our Key Point from this week's (02/19/17) Believe theme of Church is this:  If we believe the Church is God's main avenue for accomplishing his purpose today, then we must believe that we will have to actually do something to accomplish his purpose TODAY.  We cannot order up a few prayers for the unfortunates and marginalized and expect God to deliver them.  We must get off the couch and do something about the unfortunate and marginalized.  

We want God's kingdom to grow in KC.   Which means we, the Church, the Body of Christ are the intended way for this to happen.  That does not happen inside our walls.  It happens where life happens.  When we follow Christ at work, school, and home.  When we pray for kingdom growth then work for kingdom growth.  

James 2: 14 - 17  14What good is it, dear brothers and sisters, if you say you have cfaith but don’t show it by your actions? Can that kind of cfaith save anyone?15Suppose you see a brother or sister who has no food or clothing,16and you say, “Good-bye and have a good day; stay warm and eat well”—but then you don’t give that person any food or clothing. What good does that do?

17So you see, faith by itself isn’t enough. Unless it produces good deeds, it is dead and useless.


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