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November 17, 2014, 11:00 AM

Freeze Tag


Remember that game?  Freeze Tag.  In case you don't, here's a refresher for the rules.  

  1. Some one is "It."  This person runs around trying to tag people, who are subsequently running away. 
  2. When a person is tagged they must FREEZE in place, in the location where they are tagged.  
  3. A person can only move again if they are tagged by someone who is not "it."  
    1. Variations include different actions required for unfreezing someone
      1. crawling between the frozen person's legs
      2. singing a song together at the top of their lungs, etc...
  4. The game is over when everyone has either been frozen, or everyone just quits because running is hard.

The biggest variable to the game is the presence, or lack thereof, of BASE.  This is the biggest variable because there was always that kid who never left base!  If they did, they would move like two steps away, shake their hips tauntingly while waving their hands in the air, yelling: "Look at me!! I'm off of Base!!"  However, if "It" ever ran in their general direction, they would scurry back over to Base and wait for the moment to pass.  

Yeah, nobody really liked that kid.  

Lets take this vivid description of a childhood game and throw it smack-dab into our lives.  We're all playing a game of tag right now, and Sin is "it." We're being chased (or in the worst case scenario, we're chasing Sin), with the threat of being frozen in place.  The problem is, Sin runs really, really fast and we get tagged a lot.  Its in our nature to play this game with Sin, and whether we acknowledge it or not, we're running at this very moment.*  

There are things that unfreeze us, allowing us to continue the game.  Sometimes we're convicted by a rousing blog, other times its a time of confession or sharing amongst peers.   The problem is, we keep running after those moments and the game continues.  Sin never relents.  

In this game, Base is also a variable that can change the dynamics of the entire rule-set.  In the game of Freeze Tag with Sin, Jesus is Base.  He offers that one place wherein we can stay that keeps us immune from the relentless pursuit of Sin.  The problem is if you remember,  we've already painted that kid with a negative brush, making them look like someone who doesn't want to have any fun or run around like everyone else. Does that image still apply?  We want to say "NO", because we're good Christians who talk a good game and want to keep up our holy appearances.  The reality of culture speaks differently thought.  We have words we hold back to describe that kid: Goody-Two-Shoes, Mr. Holier Than Thou...  It's weird, it really is that we speak of our desire to win the game versus sin, but judge negatively those that are actively doing as such.  In this case it probably stems from jealousy or a need to be seen as cool, with a good reputation rather than from malice or bitterness.  

Moving past that bunny trail, lets look at what it means for Jesus to be our Base.  We have to look deeper than painting Jesus as a magical location like we use a tree in the game of tag.  There is no physical place we can call Sanctuary and be completely safe from being tagged. Nor will there be someplace where we can move a few steps away from, wagging our hips and hands at Sin tempting it to just try and get us while we're "here."  

There is no physical place we can find ourselves in to keep us safe.  The place we need to find ourselves is In Christ.  Paul, when he speaks of reconciliation and safety from sin, talks about being In Christ and what happens when we're there.  1 Corinthians 5: 17  - Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: the old has gone, the new is here! (NIV). When we're In Christ we are safe.  When we're In Christ we are transported to another kingdom, to a realm in which we are safe from being frozen.  

So how do we find ourselves In Christ?  First off, Jesus took the first steps when he climbed on the cross.  Bearing our sins there, he created with finality, Base...our safe place.  The steps we take next are those that determine if we're In Christ.  Are we walking closer to the cross or further away? Do the pursuits of our lives, our dreams lead us into situations in which we can be the Ambassador we're called to be by Paul shortly after in 1 Corinthians 5?  If the decisions we make every day put us in a position in which we have to hide something in order to be a proper representative of Christ, well we're still in the game and far from Base.  If we can be transparent with our desires, career goals, academic initiatives, hobbies, etc... and not hide anything from the world that will tarnish what we claim on Sunday, its a pretty good indicator that we've found ourselves on Base.  

Sin will not give up.  Sin will keep running, pursuing us.  I overheard a conversation and statement made by a truly great (and I mean, GREAT) Christian man, Otis Gatewood one Sunday while I was in college.  He was asked:  "When does temptation stop?  When will lust lose its hold?" Otis replied:  "Not Yet."  At this time, Otis was in his late 90s.  NOT YET!!!  Talk about discouraging news!  Otis followed his statement with some hopeful thoughts, because we all looked extremely discouraged:  "Christ is more powerful than lust."  This man was not frozen by sin, waiting for someone, some thing to unfreeze him.  He was firmly planted on Base and was one of the most amazing servants to the Kingdom I've ever seen.  (For more on his life, see this transcript of his funeral.  Of note, check out the story of him and his meeting with Mikhail Gorbachev).

Are we In Christ?  If so, wag those hands and hips all you want at Sin.  You can even stick our your tongue and yell "neener neener neener."  Being safe allows us such frivolities.  I'm betting though, when we find ourselves In Christ we wont have time to taunt, we'll be looking around desperately for others who've been frozen and try to tag them so they'll be free to join us on Base. 

 

*Adapted from a sermon by Andy Timm, 10/12/2014 - Macomb Christian Church 

 




November 10, 2014, 10:22 AM

Having trouble waiting that long...


"All the stolen voices will someday be returned.  The most beautiful sound I've ever heard."  - U2 - The Miracle (of Joey Ramone).  

Someday.   I don't think I can wait that long.  (A heads up:  this blog is going to say "I" a lot. Its a universal message that I'm going to be focusing inward, using personal example to make a broader point... hope it doesn't turn you off to reading further.)

When it comes to the newest gadgets, I want to preorder them before they come out so they show up at my doorstep the day of release. When it comes to food, I prefer it be prepared for me by a nice person who hands it through a window in a bag that opens widely at the top.  I preorder every book from my favorite author months in advance, so the day its released it shows up on my reading app before I even stumble out of bed.  Don't get me started on how I react when the computer doesn't respond immediately to the simple click or command I gave it within nanoseconds.  Even with batteries, I keep a couple of the rechargeable kind fully charged and ready to go so I don't have to wait for the set I've run down to build back up to full charge.  I can swap the others in and keep plugging away at the bad guys in the newest Lego video game.  

Truth:  I hate waiting.  And it may just be my downfall someday.  Because "someday" is way too long to wait for God's promises to come true.  I've built my little world around immediate gratification (all the while preaching patience to my children).  I pray these words with all the zeal I can muster:  "Come Lord Jesus"; (or if you're in to brevity: Maranatha), all the while building a life plan that stretches well past retirement.  

The attitude I carry with me for immediate gratification has a direct link to the trouble I have with gratitude and the ability to see something greater than the circumstances right in front of me.  I quite literally preached yesterday morning (11/9/14) that we need to be able to look at our circumstances like Jesus does ("What do we have to work with?"), which will lead to gratitude.  Here I sit Monday morning still stewing over some junk that threw itself into the mix on Saturday!  

Gratitude is the furthest thing from my mind.  The last thing I want to do is look around me and find out what I've got to work with.  

Truth:  God is bigger than my circumstances.  God is bigger than my disappointments.  God is bigger than my expectations.  I'm not sure what Jesus' mom had in mind when she told him to take care of the wine at the wedding in Cana in John 2: 1 - 11.  Perhaps she just meant for him to pool the disciple's resources and go buy some more (I doubt it).  No matter her expectation, Jesus provided something far beyond. He was faithful to her expectations, and rewarded that trust by exceeding them.  

Do I trust Jesus enough to lay my barrel of circumstances at his feet, trusting him to transform my distracted and frustrated heart?  The right answer is Yes.  The true answer is maybe.    From my perspective, the circumstances we're facing are a little heavier than a wedding party running out of wine (after all they were plenty drunk already... thus the surprise when the wine wasn't watered down).  If I'm to find some gratitude, I must start looking at my circumstances from Jesus' perspective.  For him, the water barrels were not the issue.  He had no problem with the request his mother made about transforming the water into wine.  Jesus looked at the circumstances from his perspective as the Son of God, and understood it could cause a ruckus if his power was revealed at that moment.  I'm sitting here looking at a water barrel, or five loaves and two fish and wonder how on earth they will be of ANY help in solving today's problems.  Jesus is looking further out, and far deeper inside than a silly barrel or a basket of food of what I think are problems.   His mind is on my heart, on what we've got to work with (a barrel and a small meal) and creating something miraculous.  

Are we going to trust Jesus enough to allow him to work with all of our circumstances (not just the blessings) to do something awesome?  

Maybe someday...

 




November 3, 2014, 10:06 AM

Hungry


We sang a new-ish song (to us) yesterday(11/2/14), upon my request entitled Hungry.  There is/was a purpose to this being the song that followed the sermon as it begins bridging the gap between sermons in this mini-series:  Full to Empty - Gratitude.  The reason I asked for it lies in the very first words sung:  "Hungry I come..."  (here's a good link to the song on YouTube).  

Its been a long time since I've been at the point of "... falling on my knees, offering all of me."  In fact I cant even remember the last time I was genuinely hungry to the point of praying/asking God for deliverance!  As we discussed in our conversation on gratitude yesterday, we have gotten into the habit of approaching the Cross already Full, leaving very little room for the God of All Creation to move in us.  

If our schedules are so full already, how can we even consider giving more time?  Our budgets are maxed out, there's just not enough left to be generous.  All of a sudden, this note on gratitude starts looking a whole lot like a sermon on money and generosity, doesn't it?  Lets clear up that confusion then:  its not.  I'm not attacking anyone's busy schedule (mine's just as crazy as everyone else's), nor am I even peeking into the checkbook to see where your money is going (our's is as tightly relegated as everyone else's).  The concept of gratitude has to work FAR earlier in our priorities than busy schedules and the money we spend/save.  

Amy Voskamp, in her introduction to the book One Thousand Gifts says this: "We were born with clenched fists..." Meaning, gratitude and generosity do not typically come as a standard feature on your base-model human.  Think of all the teaching that goes into SHARING for our children!  We have to be taught selflessness, and if not, the person that turns out is pretty well rotten.  

If we start, step one, priority number one with gratitude, our schedules being full does not limit our willingness and ability to help.  Time no longer holds us hostage.  When gratitude is our foundation our pocketbooks and registers are no longer the first thought/fear when asked for a donation or tithe.  Its a hard rewire for us because we're taught from the beginning that if we don't get good enough grades and a good enough job we might actually be uncomfortable at some point and THAT'S BAD!!!  

Creation, and the story it tells us is all about being grateful, no matter how you read it.  God planned to save us, the first time by giving us everything we need.  When that wasn't enough for us he put a plan into place to deliver us instead into a painless eternity.  There is pain along the way, but the promise of painless eternity is coming and will be fulfilled.  That alone should be enough to squeeze gratitude from us, no matter the circumstance.  

 

 




October 27, 2014, 10:00 AM

Is that really fair to God?


We talked about pain, suffering, and the fallacy of God putting those things on us yesterday in our sermon (10/26/14).  I want to spend a little bit of further time examining the simple question of "Why do we hurt?"  

The temptation we have, which is driven by centuries of doctrine and teaching is to assume that God is a part of it all, and that the pain serves a purpose in our lives.  We try and console ourselves with the thought that we must be being taught something by this trial.  And if we just endure through the end, we'll finally see the purpose of this pain and hardship brought about or allowed to happen by God.  

The problem with this is thought is that it paints God with a broad stroke of being a deity set about to punish, burden, or cause suffering on his flock with one hand and blessing us with good stuff with the other.  We cannot call him the Good Shepherd and then accuse him of leading us into a pasture that has no job, no food, no green pastures. Those pastures are a part of living in a fallen world.  And living in a fallen world means that there are places and aspects of life here that stink.  Sometimes it hurts, and that has nothing to do with God, the Good Shepherd, or a lesson we have to learn.  

So, before I get burned at the stake here, let me speak to where God IS concerned in those areas of our lives:  How we respond to the pain, the suffering, and the pastures where the pickings are slim.  More on this in a couple paragraphs. 

Now, back to the pain and suffering bit.  The pain and suffering we experience today are essentially the ripples of poor choices made a long, long, long, time ago.  Right?  When man fell we were ALL thrust into the harsh elements of life outside the perfection of the garden.  We were shoved face to face with disease, manual labor, scarcity, psychological disorders, hard childbirth, and ultimately death.  When Cain killed Able, he dropped a really big stone into a calm pond.  Adam and Eve had to live with the ripples and the wake that his poor choice caused.  Could they blame God for that?  Could they shake their fists at God and wonder what lesson he wanted them to learn through Cain's actions?  No.   Cain made a stupid choice, Adam and Eve experienced pain because of that choice.  God had nothing to do with the cause of their pain.  When we discovered ways to lengthen our lives through medicine we invited our seemingly constant battles with cancer and the like into existence.  Those are not God (or even satan) inflicted maladies, they are ripples in the pond of medical advancement and our ability to identify and treat through medicine those things that were mysteries in the past.  

What I am NOT saying is that God doesn't care about us when we suffer. That was never said, nor expressed.  God cares very much for his creation (Us).  However, God does not cause us pain, nor does he have a grand lesson we need to learn from every stubbed toe, financial mess, or hunger pang.  When we plant our feet firmly in the identity of Christ, we plant our feet on a hope of that eternity WHEN THIS LIFE IS OVER.  We used Paul a lot in our sermon yesterday, looking quite specifically at the pain he endured while serving under God's call.  Specifically we worked through 2 Corinthians 1: 8 - 10.  Bad people, who made bad choices were the cause of Paul's pain, suffering, and torture.  Not God.  

Paul understood that sometimes it hurts, and what's important is what we choose to do with the pain.  If we curse God for the pain, blaming him for all the bad stuff happening in our life we come dangerously close to heresy.  What is essential is for God's people to exhibit the Fruit of the Spirit (the Holy Spirit living in us) when things are good AND bad.  Look again at 2 Corinthians 1: 9 + 10.  There was hope that God would rescue them from the pain and hurt.  Within that hope was the understanding that it may not happen until after they had died !!  

We can learn much from pain.  And yes, there are indeed lessons that will be made obvious to us through times of scarcity and lacking.  But those are not great mysteries that only reveal themselves in those times.  Jesus was very clear about how well we would be cared for when things get tight financially (Matthew 6).  The lessons and principles upon which we should be staking our hopes were clear from the beginning, they shouldn't come as a surprise when life throws us a curve ball.  God has been teaching us how to embrace Love, Joy, Peace, Patience, Kindness, Goodness, Gentleness, Faithfulness, and Self Control from the very beginning; not just in our times of trial, want, or lacking.  

Pointing our fingers at God, or  expecting God to reveal something new and magnificent from present day suffering just isn't fair to God and the amazing presence he has been to us from the beginning.  Aren't we more precious than the sparrow? 




October 20, 2014, 12:06 PM

Where's God?


When the money runs out.  

When pain is greater than hope. 

When the outlook for the future makes the past shine like a beacon. 

Where is God when it hurts? 

He is where he was when the money was plentiful and the want was minimal.  He is where he was when there was no pain and life was full of hope.  He is in the future, as bleak as it may seem as well as in the past.  He is.  

This morning (10/20/14) has been a symphony of ups and downs.  The first meeting was in planning for a funeral service, the second for a wedding.  During our services yesterday we had an announcement of praise from parents expecting another child.  To top all of that off, I have a cold.  In other words:  I'm having a hard time seeing past the end of my own nose to find a bigger picture.  

Trying to see God working in every aspect of life proves troublesome if we only allow him to work in the good or happy times.  Often we relegate God to being "Good, all the time.  And all the time, Good."  But what about when we just dont feel it?  Meaning, what about when the pain or loss or messiness of life overrides our ability to see God working?  Does that mean God has gone from Good to Bad?   

When God seems far away, its not God who's moved.  God remains.  Unfortunately our circumstances push us aside more times than we think they do.  We allow the waves of life to throw us around.  I'm not trying to make anyone feel guilty.  Trust me, these notes are more for me than anyone else.  We have to speak honestly about ourselves through the positive and negative.  Even though we're promised that everything will work out for good in the end, we have to remember that its the ending that's good, not so much the journey.  

 


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