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September 1, 2014, 12:11 PM

I wish. I wish. I wish.


I use those words WAY too much.  They had become such a problem in our house we installed a new rule stating that anyone who used those words had to write in a Gratitude Journal.  I've caught myself a few times saying the words and looked around guiltily to see if the gratitude police was watching (the middle child).  Its funny, because page 1 is full... but we've tapered off because now we're more careful about being grateful for what we have and not longing for things we dont.  

I'm going to break the rule and spend some time wishing here in this blog and then wrap things up with a thought on contentment (this follows the theme of last week's blog, check that out here: Holy, Holy, Holy...)

I wish I could be witness (through instant replay) to God working his imagination in creation.  
   Think about that... being able to watch God create the giraffe and duckbill platypus.  Imagine the thought process he was going through when those things came to be!  They're silly creatures, and it takes a God with a sense of whimsy to create like that.  Think about the whimsy and love he put into the creation of us!!!  

I wish I could have witnessed the conversation David had with his sheep after he was anointed the next King of Israel by Samuel, then shuffled back into the pastures to watch his father's sheep.  
   "I wasnt even brought out there in the first place!!! And now I'm stuck with the sheep again!!  I'M THE KING!!!!  Arent there servants for stuff like this?"  Now, we know the character of David well enough to know that he knew his place in God's plan well enough to follow along with God's plan.  Do you think he practiced being king to his sheep?  (I would).  "You there... the fluffy one.  I Knight thee Sir Fluffy, Knight of the Green Pastures."  

I wish I could have seen Ezekiel's siege of Jerusalem in Ezekiel 4.  If you've not read that chapter recently, get to your Bible and read it!!  
   This is one of those long moments where I would question God's plan.  If you think thats out of line, read Ezekiel 4.  God's message was not to be communicated in a stirring speech or sermon.  This time Ezekiel got to send a message by lying in the dirt for over a year.  Tied up, cooking over dung, decrying Israel's disobedience the whole time.  

I wish, I wish, I wish.  Every time I throw that out there, what I'm really saying is: "I'm not happy with what I've got right now, and where I'm at right now."  I wish I was there.  I wish I knew that.  I wish I could...  All those statements have replaced this one:  I Will.

Far bigger than being content, we use wishful thinking to throw our own responsibilities onto others.  "I wish the Church would..."  "I wish they would..."  "I wish my family was..."   

The better statement is "I will make my family better by..." "I will help the Church by..."  Taking responsibility for our discontent engages us in the present, and turning discontent into activity that grows, benefits, and blesses.  David could have held a grudge against his brothers, father, and even Samuel for not pulling him away from the sheep and assigning him more kingly duties.  He even gets sent on errands later on when his brothers head off in military service to Saul.  "Aren't there servants for these things?"  

I wish I didnt have to...  I wish I was somewhere else...  I wish so-and-so would just...  I wish, I wish, I wish.  

I wish we were more content with seeing God in his creation right now.  Yes, even in the people who we dont like.  I wish we could be content with our role in the kingdom (not as king, but servant) and not pine for grander, more honorable duties.  I wish, I wish, I wish. 

And now I have to write in the Gratitude Journal. 

 




August 25, 2014, 11:47 AM

Holy, Holy, Holy. And how that might not be enough for us...


There are moments in worship services that just blow me away and send the good kind of chills up my spine.  I'm reluctant to say it, but these moments are rare for me.  I'm often in planning mode, or checking the order/slides/notes to make sure its running as well as I can control (which is limited) and getting my head ready to preach.  This week though, I had a moment that didn't just blow me away, it left a mark on my soul.  We sang On Zion's Glorious Summit early in the service, and if I could have, I would have gotten up and laid down a sermon right then and there.  What hit me is the final portion of the song, in which we slowly recount the song of the angels: "Holy, Holy, Holy."  

The voices around me were beautiful, and the parts rang true, making a sound as close to heaven as I can imagine.  There was no rush to get through, and the final notes echoed for a breath.  Those words rested on my heart, and it was about 1:30 in the morning that the thoughts finally registered as to why.  The question I woke to was this:  Would I really be content to sing that for eternity?  

If you're like me, the question can be easily dismissed with a "sure."  After all, when we're in Heaven, we wont have to worry about anything much, right?  I mean, GOD is right THERE!!!  But I moved deeper into the question and thought of a few other songs we're familiar with, and I began to be haunted by my own understandings of what being contented in eternity means.  Remember these choruses:  "I've got a mansion just over the hilltop."  "Till my trophies at last I'll lay down."   And what about the images we hold closely of gold-paved driveways, and crystal seas?  

What if?  What if there wasn't a single mansion, crown, trophy case, gold brick, or crystal body of water to be seen anywhere?  Would we start looking for the suggestion box and a golf pencil to throw out some renovation suggestions?  We would start the suggestion kindly, probably with a "To start, I'm REALLY glad I'm here and not.......you know <points down>..."  After we get the gratitude out of the way, the real issue would present itself:   "BUT, I'm looking around and maybe I missed my turn.  Where's MY mansion? I didn't put up with Sister So-and-So for three decades to be shuffled along into just another apartment complex or homeless all together."  

Examining this idea leads us to the Lord's Prayer.  As the model for prayer and communication with God, we find this very issue being addressed.  If we are willing to pray for God's will "to be on earth as it is in heaven..." we must be willing to find ourselves content on earth with what we will find ourselves content with in heaven.  Finally able to abide in the presence of God, completely joined with our creator is THE completion of all eternity.  We will find ourselves content for eternity without the gold, mansions, trophies, and crowns because God Is, and we will be with the I Am.  If we want on earth as in heaven, then we must find ourselves content with singing "Holy, Holy, Holy" to honor the magnificence of God as we stare into the face of a world being torn down around us.  We must find ourselves able to find contentment with God no matter what this world holds.  

One of my favorite authors for challenging me and getting me to think outside the box is Peter Rollins.  I've read a few of his parables during some sermons, and one that is coming to mind resides in The Orthodox Heretic with the title of the parable being Mansions.  It imagines a time with Jesus describing Heaven to some of his disciples around a fire.  He uses magnificent words to describe just how wonderful it will be, playing on the grandiose ideas present in the poor and working class folks who follow him.  They all drift into sleep thinking of all the glittering gold and towering mansions that await them as their reward.  It isn't until everyone is asleep that one disciple decides to brave out loud the thoughts rolling silently in his head.  He declares to Jesus that he isn't really drawn to the glamorous things like gold and mansions, and he wonders if there will be a place in heaven for one like him; one content with simpler rewards.  Jesus looks at him with a twinkle in his eye and tells him that indeed there is a place.  He speaks of a small, one-room shack on the outskirts that has holes in the roof that allow one to see the magnificence of the stars and glory of heaven.  In a whisper Jesus tells the man:  "that's where you'll find me, and you're welcome anytime."  

Can I be content with singing praise to the I Am knowing there isn't a mansion, trophy, or crown in it for me?  Can we find joy in worship even if we're broke?  




August 18, 2014, 12:01 PM

The Heart of God


In the sermon yesterday (8/17/14) we talked about the characteristics that show through the heart of God.  In the blog today we're talking about the one characteristic that never shows itself in God's heart.  To summarize the sermon and get us on the same page (don't you wish I'd just do this on Sundays and save us all a bunch of time!!??), the heart of God is simply love for his creation.  Far beyond the human levels of love, God SO loved us that he gave us Jesus.  The best example is the simple differences in love that we show to those we consider mere acquaintances and the love we pour on our own children.  Through his entire existence, God has showed us that he SO loves us, culminating in that ultimate sacrifice of Jesus.  THAT'S what pours from the heart of God every living, breathing, and existing moment of our lives. 

So what is is that cannot pour from the heart of God?  Simply put: selfishness.  From the beginning God gave Adam and Eve everything.  There have been postulations that placing the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil in the Garden was unjust, or even unfair; but can we really say that if we look at just how much God gave them?  They literally wanted for NOTHING!!  Even within the presence of the Testing Tree there was evidence of God's selflessness.  He had to know there was a chance his creations would choose poorly and abandon him.  God was willing to put himself completely out there, laying it all on the line for Adam and Eve, even to the point of knowing he might be heartbroken.  

God repeatedly puts his heart on the line, and into the hands of humans throughout the stories in the Bible.  He trusts us, and sometimes we reward that trust... other times we abuse it.  Perhaps no bigger promise was made than the one God makes to Abraham.  God puts all his eggs in one basket with Abram.  Its backwards in my mind then to have Abraham's test of faith come much later in the story.  If it were up to me, I'd hold back the promise until I was sure Abraham was completely trustworthy.  God doesn't.  He withholds nothing from Abram, even with the lies and deceit that occur in the midst of Abraham's travels.  

Selfishness is not a characteristic that has any presence in God's hearts.  Does it own a piece of our own?  Its human nature to look out for ourselves, #1 per say.  But if we allow ourselves to embrace selfishness, we are not able to truly pray "May Your will be done on earth as it is in Heaven."  If we really want God's will to be done, we have to eliminate our selfishness from the equation.  

Family takes on a deeper meaning when any trace of selfishness is removed.  Try having an argument when you've eliminated your need to look out for #1 and seek the best for others first.  

Church looks more like its intent when selfishness is removed.  It would no longer be all about us, but about the glorification of God in the lives of others.  Sure, we try and do that anyways, but what about when the glorification of God in the lives of others distracts or annoys us?  We feel the need to complain or move on to other churches where it meets all of our expectations. 

Watch the eyes of people when you put them first, at the cost of ourselves.  It happens so rarely in our culture that people sometimes dont even know how to react!  

More so, watch what happens to our hearts when we sing along with God's selflessness.  Its not all about me, you, or us.  

May Your will be done in me as it is in Heaven.  

 




August 11, 2014, 2:42 PM

A Painting of God


What does God look like?  Thats one of those eternal questions that is only answered after we have exhausted our time here on Earth.  At least in the physical, "I am LOOKING at God" sense.  Moses was gifted with the presence of God and was given the chance to glimpse the passing essence of a physical manifestation of God on Mt. Sinai.  Outside of that, God the Father has remained in the background so to speak.  

When Jesus hops onto the scene, we get our first complete glimpse of a member of the Trinity.  God smiled and frowned.  God spoke.  God cried.  There, in the face of Jesus, were all the emotions of God shown on the canvas of those he made in His image.  And that image, and those emotions are no longer present in the physical realm of earth.  

What are we left with if we want to see the physical manifestation of God?  Hopefully not just those pictures of Swedish-Jesus.  You know, the ones where he has blue eyes, blond hair (with highlights of course), and looks handsome and rugged at the same time as he stares into the distance.  Nope.  No picture can do him justice.  

What we have left on earth to display the physical presence and emotion of God is the Church.  When the Church (thats the people, not the building) displays love: the world sees God's love and smile.  Conversely, when the Church lashes out in anger, or condemnation, we typically do not see God's righteous anger over injustice, we see an angry God who doesn't really love the world (unlike what we're told in John 3:16).  

We paint a picture of God by the choices we make, the words we use, and the lives we live.  Does the God you paint with your life show forgiveness and compassion?  Or, is he vindictive and unjust in his prejudices?  

Simply put: God looks like us, Church.  Or rather, we are the picture of God to the world.  Does he look happy?  Indeed, the picture being painted of God by those folks at Westboro Baptist is of a God who's love is conditional and very limited in its scope.  

Are we painting with the same brush?  I really hope not.  But if thats to be true, our lives must be rich with the character, heart, face, hands, and feet of a loving God.   




August 4, 2014, 10:45 AM

When God is Silent, Part 2


This is a follow-up to my sermon on 8/3/14 - "When God is Silent" (click the title to be taken to the audio).  

I regret not being bolder in my sermon and saying that I have never physically heard the voice of God in my life.  I regret not saying it because I regret not being able to follow up with this:  "And I'm Fine With That."   I have not been prompted to go here, there, or anywhere.  I've not been told to talk to a particular person at a particular time, or whether to take a particular job or to keep looking....and I'm fine with that.  

While I have not heard God's affirming voice when I'm in the middle of a decision, I have felt the confidence of his affirmation to the choices I've made after prayer, study, and consideration of making decisions the right way.  I've seen the hand of God as I look back at choices I've made.  The best, and perhaps the most convincing example of God's invisible hand and inaudible voice comes in the form of the most difficult year of my adult life.  At the time, I was not fine with the direction of my life, having been dismissed from a church ministry position. THAT wasn't part of the plan.  That was not what I expected to hear from God.  The year afterward was spent in a job that was NOT for me.  In a city that was NOT the best place for our family.  I was wrestling with a lack of confidence in myself and therefore treating myself poorly, which in turn WAS the worst thing to do to our marriage.   Where was God's hand and voice in all of this?  Exactly in the same place he is today, yesterday, and eternally:  right by my side.  Looking back through that hazy mist and the very real possibility of leaving ministry forever I see God.  Yes, in the mess of that year I see and hear God, in his silence at that moment.  

In that year we heard God more clearly than ever before......and didn't know about it until we had moved on and recovered.  While the righteous actions and motivations were missing from my life, the mantle of fellowship, hospitality, and compassion were being held up by those around us.  God's voice was being made audible in the caring prayers of a group of elders that I did not (and really still don't) know.  It was being heard in the voice and care of a Doctor who treated Reese's allergies, giving us the first night's sleep in 6 months.  

If it weren't for that time when I assumed God had gone silent, I never would have known how to hear Him clearly ever again.  As we read deeper in scripture we discover a message spelled out to us as clear as the clearest day.  We are given the filter through which all decisions must be run through.  God has provided the step-by-step instructions on how to deal with problem people, horrible bosses, injustices at home, struggling marriages, and hopeful dreams for tomorrow.  

God has spoken louder and clearer than ever before, had it all written down, and ensured it to be carefully preserved for us to peruse at our leisure and at times of peril.  Never has God's voice been clearer than when the vocal chords of Jesus worked to express the words of God. And from those vocal chords came all the words from God I will ever need to hear:  Love God, Love People.  (Matthew 22:37 - 39).  

If we're waiting for more, we wait in vain.  If we want the picture focused better than that, we wait in vain.  If we expect God to explain the expectations of Christ-Followers further, we wait in vain.  While we think God silent these days and the voice of the world overpowering, we simply have turned our ears to the wrong direction, missing the whispers amidst the shouting.  

And yes, Love God + Love People applies to everyone and everything.  It sounds almost TOO simplistic of a response to apply to what we interpret as a life far more complicated and complex for such simplicity.  But look back at the simple answer God often gives to those facing troubles and things way above their pay scale:  I Am.  That's it...I Am.  Job asked for more and boy, did he get more.  He got God's explanation of just how "I AM" the I Am is.  Job 38 - 39; 41.  You want more?  God doesn't need to give us any more.  Because he is the I Am.  He always has been and always will be.  That's enough assurance that his promises stand and that everything we hope he will deliver he will deliver.  God has already spoken...  clear enough to last for centuries.  Maybe if we're struggling to hear him today we need to quit talking enough to hear what he has already said, plain as day:  Love God, Love People.   

Deep down I KNOW that I don't need to hear another word from God in my lifetime.  Sitting on my hands and waiting for him to speak clearly to me specifically to do something specific for the kingdom is a waste of the resources, power, Spirit, and directions he has already given.  What I need is the confidence to trust what I've already heard.  Because I was put in just such a place for just such a time as this.  (Esther 4:14)

 


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